Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine occupies one of the oldest houses of worship in Downeast Maine. The original structure was built in 1791 and fulfilled the requirement for each new community in the Province of Maine to build a meeting house suitable for the “publick worship of God.”


As was typical of the time, the meeting house served as the site of both Sunday worship and town meetings. In the 1820s, the congregation split into two groups who disagreed over theology. One group left the congregation and formed the Trinitarian Congregational Parish (now on Main Street) while the other group remained, later reorganizing as Unitarian. The meeting house was redesigned in the 1830s, and a new bell was installed, cast by Paul Revere’s son, Joseph Warren Revere. The bell still rings on Sunday mornings.


The meeting house remains an important gathering place in Castine. It is home to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine, whose mission includes supporting and sustaining the spiritual, ethical, intellectual, and overall well-being of its members.


For more information, please visit the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Castine's website: http://uucastine.org/